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Wellbeing matters. Having a sense of purpose, life satisfaction, self-acceptance and belonging that is fostered through social interaction, exchange and connectedness matters. Butetown continues to generate representations of itself ‘from within’. These understandings of community life, along with the everyday activities and interactions among people in the area, remain a key factor in individual and community wellbeing. Representing Butetown was a three -year project aimed at using creative-arts practices to showcase existing – and to co-produce new – representations of Tiger Bay and the Docks that are of value to local people and that can inform local policy for health and wellbeing.This public art installation is a collaboration with photographers who have made this area and its people a focus in their work. Coinciding with the end of the study, and the start of a new chapter in the nation’s wellbeing agenda, the installation centres on the lived experiences and the day-to-day performances of wellbeing by elders, many of whom live in – or retain strong links to – this area.
Contributing photographers:John BriggsAnthony CampbellSimon CampbellAndrew McNeillKeith Murrell
Representing Communities is a three-year project exploring how community representations produced through the arts can be used to inform the development of local policy and services for health and wellbeing. Representing Butetown is one of the five UK study sites. The project was funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council’s Connected Communities programme.www.representingcommunities.co.uk

The exhibition was mounted along Bute Street for one year and a half, and then it moved to the WMC for one month in 2017.
Original languageEnglish
Media of outputPhotograph
Sizelarge, 10 panel
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2016

    Research areas

  • Wales, community engagement, Butetown, co-production, wellbeing, ageing and identity

ID: 2938279