The effects of combined action observation and motor imagery on corticospinal excitability and movement outcomes: Two meta-analyses

Samantha Chye, Ashika Valappil, David Wright, Cornelia Frank, David Shearer, Christopher Tyler, Ceri Diss, Omar Mian, Neale Tillin, Adam Bruton*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Motor simulation interventions involving motor imagery (MI) and action observation (AO) have received considerable interest in the behavioral sciences. A growing body of research has focused on using AO and MI simultaneously, termed ‘combined action observation and motor imagery’ (AOMI). The current paper includes two meta-analyses that quantify changes in corticospinal excitability and motor skill performance for AOMI compared to AO, MI and control conditions. Specifically, the first meta-analysis collated and synthesized existing motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude data from transcranial magnetic stimulation studies and the second meta-analysis collated and synthesized existing movement outcome data from behavioral studies. AOMI had a positive effect compared to control and AO but not MI conditions for both MEP amplitudes and movement outcomes. No methodological factors moderated the effects of AOMI, indicating a robust effect of AOMI across the two outcome variables. The results of the meta-analyses are discussed in relation to existing literature on motor simulation and skill acquisition, before providing viable directions for future research on this topic.
Original languageEnglish
Article number104911
Number of pages15
JournalNeuroscience and Behavioral Reviews
Volume143
Early online date5 Nov 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2022

Keywords

  • AOMI
  • Action Observation and Motor Imagery
  • Motor evoked potentials
  • Dual action simulation
  • Motor execution
  • Motor imagery during action observation
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation

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