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The Creative turn in evidence for public health : community and arts-based methodologies. / Saltus, Roiyah; Byrne, Ellie; Elliott, Eva; Angharad, Jen.

In: Journal of Public Health , Vol. 40, No. Supplement 1, 4925600, 09.03.2018, p. i24-i30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Saltus, R, Byrne, E, Elliott, E & Angharad, J 2018, 'The Creative turn in evidence for public health: community and arts-based methodologies', Journal of Public Health , vol. 40, no. Supplement 1, 4925600, pp. i24-i30. https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdx151

APA

Saltus, R., Byrne, E., Elliott, E., & Angharad, J. (2018). The Creative turn in evidence for public health: community and arts-based methodologies. Journal of Public Health , 40(Supplement 1), i24-i30. [4925600]. https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdx151

Vancouver

Saltus R, Byrne E, Elliott E, Angharad J. The Creative turn in evidence for public health: community and arts-based methodologies. Journal of Public Health . 2018 Mar 9;40(Supplement 1):i24-i30. 4925600. https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdx151

Author

Saltus, Roiyah ; Byrne, Ellie ; Elliott, Eva ; Angharad, Jen. / The Creative turn in evidence for public health : community and arts-based methodologies. In: Journal of Public Health . 2018 ; Vol. 40, No. Supplement 1. pp. i24-i30.

BibTeX

@article{4153fe1e2c95403a974ecff38fe910bb,
title = "The Creative turn in evidence for public health: community and arts-based methodologies",
abstract = "BackgroundWe propose that arts based methodologies can be of value in the production and exchange of evidence in supporting public health related policy. This paper reports on a collaborative piece of work resulting from two projects which took place in a former coal mining town in South Wales.MethodsWe used a participatory framework whereby researchers, community members and artists co-produced ‘evidence’ through the creative arts to inform public policy. We collected a range of data using a number of different techniques. including interviews, focus groups and observation, but also included an extensive range of creative activities.ResultsThe data provided a diverse range of perspectives on how people of different ages live their lives. The People’s Platform was a performance-based debate which was the culmination of the collaboration. The show involved a series of short performances with time for facilitated discussion in-between. It was felt that the show facilitated knowledge exchange on health and wellbeing issues that are usually difficult to express and understand through traditional forms of evidence.ConclusionWhilst arts-based approaches are not free from risk, they offer an alternative form of knowledge as a necessary complement to the range of data available to policy makers.",
keywords = "methods , public health , Communities, Wales",
author = "Roiyah Saltus and Ellie Byrne and Eva Elliott and Jen Angharad",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1093/pubmed/fdx151",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "i24--i30",
journal = "Journal of Public Health",
issn = "1741-3842",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "Supplement 1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Creative turn in evidence for public health

T2 - community and arts-based methodologies

AU - Saltus, Roiyah

AU - Byrne, Ellie

AU - Elliott, Eva

AU - Angharad, Jen

PY - 2018/3/9

Y1 - 2018/3/9

N2 - BackgroundWe propose that arts based methodologies can be of value in the production and exchange of evidence in supporting public health related policy. This paper reports on a collaborative piece of work resulting from two projects which took place in a former coal mining town in South Wales.MethodsWe used a participatory framework whereby researchers, community members and artists co-produced ‘evidence’ through the creative arts to inform public policy. We collected a range of data using a number of different techniques. including interviews, focus groups and observation, but also included an extensive range of creative activities.ResultsThe data provided a diverse range of perspectives on how people of different ages live their lives. The People’s Platform was a performance-based debate which was the culmination of the collaboration. The show involved a series of short performances with time for facilitated discussion in-between. It was felt that the show facilitated knowledge exchange on health and wellbeing issues that are usually difficult to express and understand through traditional forms of evidence.ConclusionWhilst arts-based approaches are not free from risk, they offer an alternative form of knowledge as a necessary complement to the range of data available to policy makers.

AB - BackgroundWe propose that arts based methodologies can be of value in the production and exchange of evidence in supporting public health related policy. This paper reports on a collaborative piece of work resulting from two projects which took place in a former coal mining town in South Wales.MethodsWe used a participatory framework whereby researchers, community members and artists co-produced ‘evidence’ through the creative arts to inform public policy. We collected a range of data using a number of different techniques. including interviews, focus groups and observation, but also included an extensive range of creative activities.ResultsThe data provided a diverse range of perspectives on how people of different ages live their lives. The People’s Platform was a performance-based debate which was the culmination of the collaboration. The show involved a series of short performances with time for facilitated discussion in-between. It was felt that the show facilitated knowledge exchange on health and wellbeing issues that are usually difficult to express and understand through traditional forms of evidence.ConclusionWhilst arts-based approaches are not free from risk, they offer an alternative form of knowledge as a necessary complement to the range of data available to policy makers.

KW - methods

KW - public health

KW - Communities

KW - Wales

U2 - 10.1093/pubmed/fdx151

DO - 10.1093/pubmed/fdx151

M3 - Article

C2 - 29538726

VL - 40

SP - i24-i30

JO - Journal of Public Health

JF - Journal of Public Health

SN - 1741-3842

IS - Supplement 1

M1 - 4925600

ER -

ID: 1281618