The Consul and the Beatnik: The Establishment, Youth Culture and the Beginnings of the Hippy Trail (1966—68)

Brian Ireland, Sharif Gemie

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    85 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This paper analyses the attitudes expressed by consular and embassy officials to a new type of traveller they encountered in the mid-1960s. Their observations are contextualised within wider debates concerning ‘youth’ in the late 1950s and 1960s. Officials distinguished sharply between ‘overlanders’ (who could be tolerated or accommodated) and ‘beatniks’ whose behaviour was characterized as illegal and/or unacceptable. Smoking cannabis was identified as a key marker of beatnik behaviour. Officials' observations are contrasted with four accounts by new travellers from the period. The paper concludes with a proposal for an ‘anti-nominian’ approach to the study of youth cultures: researchers should be more sensitive to the constructed nature of the labels used to identify the various strands of youth identity.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number3052190
    Pages (from-to)440-464
    Number of pages25
    JournalTwentieth Century British History
    Volume3
    Issue number1
    Early online date23 Feb 2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2017

    Keywords

    • Beatnik
    • Youth Culture
    • hippie
    • counterculture of the 1960s
    • Kathmandu
    • Goa
    • hippy trail
    • young people
    • Consular officials

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The Consul and the Beatnik: The Establishment, Youth Culture and the Beginnings of the Hippy Trail (1966—68)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this