Provoking Mathematical Thinking: Experiences of Doing Realistic Mathematics Tasks with Adult Numeracy Teachers (ALM-20)

Janette Gibney

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

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Abstract

This action research project looks at what happened when a small group of adult numeracy teachers with widely different experiences of learning and teaching mathematics explored
their own informal numeracy practices and undertook a series of collaborative mathematical tasks. Evidence from qualitative data collected during the enquiry suggests that realistic tasks can provoke a range of mathematical thinking and learning responses which allow us to identify ways in which procedural and conceptual thinking is being used, and to track learning journeys through different stages of problem-solving. Although more experienced numeracy teachers could move between and within their ‘real worlds’ and ‘maths worlds’ with intent and ease, others had less integrated experiences, often valuing perceived
mathematical powers over their own intuitive powers, with mixed success.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdults Learning Mathematics - A Research Forum 1993-2018 Celebrating 25 years: A lot done, a lot more yet to do
EditorsKatherine Safford-Ramus, John Keogh, John O'Donoghue, Terry Maguire
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherAdults Learning Mathematics
Pages409-430
VolumeSpecial Edition
Edition1
ISBN (Print)978-1-912804-10-8
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Professional Development
  • Adult Numeracy
  • Teacher education
  • mathematical thinking
  • action research
  • adult numeracy teachers
  • realistic
  • realisable
  • mathematisation
  • collaborative classroom
  • intra- and extra-dimensional

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