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‘No provenance is better than wrong provenance’: Milford Haven and the Stonehenge sandstones. / Ixer, Rob ; Bevins, Richard; Pirrie, Duncan; Turner, Peter; Power, Matthew.

In: Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine, Vol. 113, 05.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Ixer, R, Bevins, R, Pirrie, D, Turner, P & Power, M 2020, '‘No provenance is better than wrong provenance’: Milford Haven and the Stonehenge sandstones', Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine, vol. 113.

APA

Ixer, R., Bevins, R., Pirrie, D., Turner, P., & Power, M. (2020). ‘No provenance is better than wrong provenance’: Milford Haven and the Stonehenge sandstones. Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine, 113.

Vancouver

Ixer R, Bevins R, Pirrie D, Turner P, Power M. ‘No provenance is better than wrong provenance’: Milford Haven and the Stonehenge sandstones. Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine. 2020 May;113.

Author

Ixer, Rob ; Bevins, Richard ; Pirrie, Duncan ; Turner, Peter ; Power, Matthew. / ‘No provenance is better than wrong provenance’: Milford Haven and the Stonehenge sandstones. In: Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine. 2020 ; Vol. 113.

BibTeX

@article{f2784792dbff427b847a44a064ade089,
title = "‘No provenance is better than wrong provenance’: Milford Haven and the Stonehenge sandstones",
abstract = "For over 70 years there has been confusion within the archaeological literature between the Stonehenge ‘Old Red Sandstone’ Altar Stone, the Stonehenge Ordovician-Silurian Lower Palaeozoic Sandstone debitage and the Old Red Sandstone (Devonian) Cosheston Group sandstones. However, all three are very different lithologies with separate geographical origins. The Altar Stone is most likely to be from eastern Wales and the Lower Palaeozoic Sandstone from west Wales north of the Mynydd Preseli; neither of these two Stonehenge-related sandstones is from Mill Bay, Milford Haven as has been suggested. Recent petrographical analysis no longer supports the theory that the Stonehenge bluestones were shipped seawards from there along the Severn Estuary.",
author = "Rob Ixer and Richard Bevins and Duncan Pirrie and Peter Turner and Matthew Power",
year = "2020",
month = "5",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
journal = "Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine",
issn = "0262-6608",
publisher = "The Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - ‘No provenance is better than wrong provenance’: Milford Haven and the Stonehenge sandstones

AU - Ixer, Rob

AU - Bevins, Richard

AU - Pirrie, Duncan

AU - Turner, Peter

AU - Power, Matthew

PY - 2020/5

Y1 - 2020/5

N2 - For over 70 years there has been confusion within the archaeological literature between the Stonehenge ‘Old Red Sandstone’ Altar Stone, the Stonehenge Ordovician-Silurian Lower Palaeozoic Sandstone debitage and the Old Red Sandstone (Devonian) Cosheston Group sandstones. However, all three are very different lithologies with separate geographical origins. The Altar Stone is most likely to be from eastern Wales and the Lower Palaeozoic Sandstone from west Wales north of the Mynydd Preseli; neither of these two Stonehenge-related sandstones is from Mill Bay, Milford Haven as has been suggested. Recent petrographical analysis no longer supports the theory that the Stonehenge bluestones were shipped seawards from there along the Severn Estuary.

AB - For over 70 years there has been confusion within the archaeological literature between the Stonehenge ‘Old Red Sandstone’ Altar Stone, the Stonehenge Ordovician-Silurian Lower Palaeozoic Sandstone debitage and the Old Red Sandstone (Devonian) Cosheston Group sandstones. However, all three are very different lithologies with separate geographical origins. The Altar Stone is most likely to be from eastern Wales and the Lower Palaeozoic Sandstone from west Wales north of the Mynydd Preseli; neither of these two Stonehenge-related sandstones is from Mill Bay, Milford Haven as has been suggested. Recent petrographical analysis no longer supports the theory that the Stonehenge bluestones were shipped seawards from there along the Severn Estuary.

M3 - Article

VL - 113

JO - Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine

JF - Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine

SN - 0262-6608

ER -

ID: 3535286