Navigating dyslexia and social identity: A constructivist grounded theory exploration of first year undergraduate students’ experiences following initial diagnosis

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Over 80% of people with dyslexia will leave school without a diagnosis. For those who cannot afford to pay privately, diagnosis is rarely an option (APPG, 2019). An assessment is often sought out at higher education once a tipping point is reached, following careful consideration of benefits and implications, such as stigma and disclosure. The purpose of this doctoral research is to develop a substantive theoretical model. This shows how receiving an initial diagnosis of dyslexia during the first academic year, in the social context of a university environment, could affect personal and social identity development. There is limited research on how demanding the transition to university is for a person with dyslexia. Social support and social identities are crucial resources affecting well-being and reducing self-directed threat when faced with stressful situations (McIntyre et al., 2018). The study took a Constructivist Grounded Theory approach to discover the participants’ experiences. The study included 14 participants (10 female; 4 male) from one university. Data were collected longitudinally across an academic year through semi-structured interviews. This included experience of emergency online learning due to COVID-19 restrictions, and associated delays in access to assistive software and support. A tentative model of social identity formation of first year dyslexic students diagnosed at university is presented. This highlights the importance of social support for successful transition and gives a novel perspective on the coping mechanisms deployed when dealing with adverse and unprecedented stressful experiences.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusIn preparation - 2022
EventSPSSI-EASP Small Group Meeting 2022: Society in the classroom: Integrating perspectives on how socioeconomic disparities unfold in educational settings - London School of Economics, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 30 Jun 20223 Jul 2022
https://www.spssi.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewPage&pageID=2734&nodeID=1

Conference

ConferenceSPSSI-EASP Small Group Meeting 2022
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period30/06/223/07/22
Internet address

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