Miocene glaciomarine sedimentation in the northern Antarctic Peninsula region: the stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Hobbs Glacier Formation, James Ross Island

D Pirrie, J. Alistair Crame, JB Riding, AR Butcher, PD Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The onshore record of Cenozoic glaciation in the Antarctic Peninsula region is Limited to a number of isolated localities on Alexander Island, the South Shetland Islands and in the James Ross Island area. In the James Ross Island area, Late Cretaceous sedimentary rocks are unconformably overlain by a unit of diamictites and tuffs, which occur at the base of the James Ross Island Volcanic Group. These rocks are here defined as the Hobbs Glacier Formation, and on the basis of palynological studies are assigned to a Miocene (?late Miocene) age. The diamictites are interpreted as representing glaciomarine sedimentation close to the grounding Line of either a floating ice shelf or a grounded tidewater glacier in a marine basin. Provenance studies indicate that the glacier was flowing from the Antarctic Peninsula towards the southeast. Volcanic tuffs conformably overlie the diamictites and are interpreted as representing deposition in a periglacial delta front setting in either a marine or non-marine basin, away from direct glacial influence. The Hobbs Glacier Formation and overlying James Ross Island Volcanic Group help to enhance our understanding of the Neogene glacial chronology of West Antarctica.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)745-762
Number of pages18
JournalGeological Magazine
Volume134
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1997

Keywords

  • VEGA-ISLAND
  • CRETACEOUS STRATIGRAPHY
  • CAPE LAMB

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