Lifelong exposure to high-altitude hypoxia in humans is associated with improved redox homeostasis and structural-functional adaptations of the neurovascular unit

Benjamin Stacey, Hannah G. Caldwell, Ryan L. Hoiland, Philip Ainslie, Connor A. Howe, Tyler D. Vermeulen, Michael Tymko, Christopher Gasho, Gustavo A. Vizcardo-Galindo, Daniela Bermudez, Francisco C. Villafuerte, Romulo J Figueroa-mujica, Édouard Tuaillon, Christoph Hirtz, Sylvain Lehmann, Nicola Marchi, Hayato Tsukamoto, Damian Bailey*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Medicine & Life Sciences