In vitro significance of SOCS-3 and SOCS-4 and potential mechanistic links to wound healing

Yi Feng, Andrew J. Sanders, Liam D. Morgan, Sioned Owen, Fiona Ruge, Keith G. Harding, Wen G. Jiang*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Wound healing and the management of chronic wounds represent a significant burden on the NHS. Members of the suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) family have been implicated in the regulation of a range of cellular processes. The current study aims to explore the importance of SOCS-3 and SOCS-4 in regulating cellular traits associated with wound healing. SOCS-3 over-expression and SOCS-4 knockdown mutant lines were generated and verified using q-PCR and western blotting in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and endothelial cells (HECV). Over-expression of SOCS-3 resulted in a significantly reduced proliferative rate in HaCaT keratinocytes and also enhanced the tubule formation capacity of HECV cells. SOCS-4 knockdown significantly reduced HaCaT migration and HECV cell tubule formation. Suppression of SOCS-4 influenced the responsiveness of HaCaT and HECV cells to EGF and TGF beta and resulted in a dysregulation of phospho-protein expression in HaCaT cells. SOCS-3 and SOCS-4 appear to play regulatory roles in a number of keratinocyte and endothelial cellular traits associated with the wound healing process and may also be able to regulate the responsiveness of these cells to EGF and TGF beta. This implies a potential regulatory role in the wound healing process and, thus highlights their potential as novel therapies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6715
Number of pages15
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • FOCAL ADHESION KINASE
  • CELL-MIGRATION
  • SKIN REPAIR
  • ANGIOGENESIS
  • SUPPRESSORS
  • STAT3
  • OVEREXPRESSION
  • IDENTIFICATION
  • KERATINOCYTES
  • INFLAMMATION

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