Design and development of a thermal imaging system based on a temperature sensor array for temperature measurements of enclosed surfaces and its use at the body-seat interface

Zhuofu Liu, Chang Le, Zhongming Luo, Vincenzo Cascioli, Andrew Heusch, Peter McCarthy

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Abstract

We describe a mapping system based on 64 evenly spaced digital sensors (thermal in this example) and interpolation algorithms. Current pressure mapping systems are suspect to noise, signal drift (creep), hysteresis and drop out of pixels, requiring frequent recalibration all of which impact on accuracy and experimental protocols.

The system described here uses a one-wire-based protocol for easy configuration and reliable measurement without requiring frequent re-calibration and can continuously measure temperature over a surface (seat or mattress) for hours. Additionally, in this example, the system can be used to overcome inherent drawbacks of traditional temperature (or humidity) assessment, being capable of mapping entire regions simultaneously. It greatly outperforms visual imaging (i.e. infrared) techniques at enclosed surfaces.
The system, as shown here, could prove invaluable in future development of monitoring systems as it allows for more accurate parameter modeling at enclosed surfaces such as the body-seat interface. This will be useful when creating more realistic understanding of the changes occurring and how to moderate them effectively in order to reduce problems associated with prolonged wheelchair use.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberMEAS-D-15-02027R2
Pages (from-to)123-131
JournalMeasurement
Volume104
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017

Keywords

  • temperature measurement
  • Savitzky–Golay filter
  • cubic image interpolation
  • body-seat interface

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