Applying the Asymmetric Information Management Technique to virtual interviewing

Cody Porter*, Rachel Taylor, Rory Lee, Eleanora Chioatto, Max Hill, Adam Harvey

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

The Asymmetric Information Management (AIM) technique enhances verbal lie-detection by encouraging truth tellers (but not liars) to be forthcoming with information. We examined the AIM technique's utility for correctly distinguishing genuine and fabricated statements reported during a virtual interview. Truth tellers (n = 85) honestly reported their recollection of a 30-minute walk. Liars pretended to have engaged in a similar activity (n = 86). Participants were randomly assigned to either the AIM or Control condition and provided either a verbal or written statement. Truth tellers in the AIM condition reported more detailed statements (vs. the Control condition). Liars in the AIM condition reported less detailed statements (vs. the Control condition). More genuine and fabricated statements were correctly classified in the AIM condition (72% accuracy) compared to the Control condition (59% accuracy). No differences between disclosure type emerged. Results support the use of the AIM technique for facilitating verbal lie-detection.
Original languageEnglish
Article number4049
Pages (from-to)470-479
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume37
Issue number3
Early online date3 Feb 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 May 2023

Keywords

  • Lie-detection
  • AIM technique
  • information education

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