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Alcohol-Related Neurocognitive Disorders: A Naturalistic Study of Nosology and Estimation of Prevalence in South Wales, UK. / Heirene, Robert; Roderique-Davies, Gareth; Angelakis, Ioannis; John, Bev.

In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, Vol. 81, No. 5, 09.10.2020, p. 584-594.

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@article{7cad127bf1d04c8db200d2ed5b8f0f76,
title = "Alcohol-Related Neurocognitive Disorders: A Naturalistic Study of Nosology and Estimation of Prevalence in South Wales, UK",
abstract = "Objective: Existing studies relating to the prevalence of Alcohol-Related Neurocognitive Disorders (ARNDs; e.g., Korsakoff’s Syndrome, Alcohol-related dementia) are now outdated and few have been undertaken in the UK. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of ARNDs in South Wales, UK, and determine the specific diagnostic terms and criteria used in clinical practice.Method: A naturalistic, survey-based prevalence study was undertaken wherein data were collected retrospectively for all individuals with ARNDs attending services during all of 2015 and 2016. A diverse sample of health and social care services (N = 60) in South Wales took part in the study. Results: Four-hundred and ninety individuals with ARNDs were identified by participating services, equating to an age-specific rate of 34 individuals per 100,000 inhabitants. Variability was observed across age-ranges and genders, with most identified in the 45-64 age-range and a male-female ratio of 2.6:1. Twenty-three individuals under the age of 35 were identified, demonstrating an increase in younger cases compared with previous studies. Various different diagnostic terms were used, with “Alcohol-Related Brain Damage” being most common. Only 6.3{\%} of cases were diagnosed according to specific criteria and 44.3{\%} were reported as having a “probable” ARND, meaning no official diagnosis had been designated but initial assessments indicated that they likely had an ARND. Conclusions: Findings provide a novel understanding of ARND prevalence in a previously under-studied area; although the prevalence estimate is conservative and should be interpreted cautiously for reasons discussed. Findings also highlight an inconsistency between diagnoses presented in nosological systems (e.g., ICD-10) and those used in practice and therefore a need to evaluate novel diagnostic conceptualisations of alcohol-related neurocognitive impairment.",
keywords = "Korsakoff’s syndrome, Alcohol-Related Brain Damage, ARBD, Alcohol-related dementia, prevalence",
author = "Robert Heirene and Gareth Roderique-Davies and Ioannis Angelakis and Bev John",
year = "2020",
month = "10",
day = "9",
doi = "10.15288/jsad.2020.81.584",
language = "English",
volume = "81",
pages = "584--594",
journal = "Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs",
issn = "1937-1888",
publisher = "Alcohol Research Documentation, Inc.",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Alcohol-Related Neurocognitive Disorders: A Naturalistic Study of Nosology and Estimation of Prevalence in South Wales, UK

AU - Heirene, Robert

AU - Roderique-Davies, Gareth

AU - Angelakis, Ioannis

AU - John, Bev

PY - 2020/10/9

Y1 - 2020/10/9

N2 - Objective: Existing studies relating to the prevalence of Alcohol-Related Neurocognitive Disorders (ARNDs; e.g., Korsakoff’s Syndrome, Alcohol-related dementia) are now outdated and few have been undertaken in the UK. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of ARNDs in South Wales, UK, and determine the specific diagnostic terms and criteria used in clinical practice.Method: A naturalistic, survey-based prevalence study was undertaken wherein data were collected retrospectively for all individuals with ARNDs attending services during all of 2015 and 2016. A diverse sample of health and social care services (N = 60) in South Wales took part in the study. Results: Four-hundred and ninety individuals with ARNDs were identified by participating services, equating to an age-specific rate of 34 individuals per 100,000 inhabitants. Variability was observed across age-ranges and genders, with most identified in the 45-64 age-range and a male-female ratio of 2.6:1. Twenty-three individuals under the age of 35 were identified, demonstrating an increase in younger cases compared with previous studies. Various different diagnostic terms were used, with “Alcohol-Related Brain Damage” being most common. Only 6.3% of cases were diagnosed according to specific criteria and 44.3% were reported as having a “probable” ARND, meaning no official diagnosis had been designated but initial assessments indicated that they likely had an ARND. Conclusions: Findings provide a novel understanding of ARND prevalence in a previously under-studied area; although the prevalence estimate is conservative and should be interpreted cautiously for reasons discussed. Findings also highlight an inconsistency between diagnoses presented in nosological systems (e.g., ICD-10) and those used in practice and therefore a need to evaluate novel diagnostic conceptualisations of alcohol-related neurocognitive impairment.

AB - Objective: Existing studies relating to the prevalence of Alcohol-Related Neurocognitive Disorders (ARNDs; e.g., Korsakoff’s Syndrome, Alcohol-related dementia) are now outdated and few have been undertaken in the UK. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of ARNDs in South Wales, UK, and determine the specific diagnostic terms and criteria used in clinical practice.Method: A naturalistic, survey-based prevalence study was undertaken wherein data were collected retrospectively for all individuals with ARNDs attending services during all of 2015 and 2016. A diverse sample of health and social care services (N = 60) in South Wales took part in the study. Results: Four-hundred and ninety individuals with ARNDs were identified by participating services, equating to an age-specific rate of 34 individuals per 100,000 inhabitants. Variability was observed across age-ranges and genders, with most identified in the 45-64 age-range and a male-female ratio of 2.6:1. Twenty-three individuals under the age of 35 were identified, demonstrating an increase in younger cases compared with previous studies. Various different diagnostic terms were used, with “Alcohol-Related Brain Damage” being most common. Only 6.3% of cases were diagnosed according to specific criteria and 44.3% were reported as having a “probable” ARND, meaning no official diagnosis had been designated but initial assessments indicated that they likely had an ARND. Conclusions: Findings provide a novel understanding of ARND prevalence in a previously under-studied area; although the prevalence estimate is conservative and should be interpreted cautiously for reasons discussed. Findings also highlight an inconsistency between diagnoses presented in nosological systems (e.g., ICD-10) and those used in practice and therefore a need to evaluate novel diagnostic conceptualisations of alcohol-related neurocognitive impairment.

KW - Korsakoff’s syndrome

KW - Alcohol-Related Brain Damage

KW - ARBD

KW - Alcohol-related dementia

KW - prevalence

U2 - 10.15288/jsad.2020.81.584

DO - 10.15288/jsad.2020.81.584

M3 - Article

VL - 81

SP - 584

EP - 594

JO - Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

JF - Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

SN - 1937-1888

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 3438754