Transcerebral Exchange Kinetics of Nitrite and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Acute Mountain Sickness Evidence Against Trigeminovascular Activation?

Kevin Evans, Damian Bailey, Sarah Taudorf, Ronan M G Berg, Lars T Jensen, Carsten Lundby, Philip E James, Bente K Pedersen, Kirsten Moller

Allbwn ymchwil: Cyfraniad at gyfnodolynErthygladolygiad gan gymheiriaid

Crynodeb

Background and Purpose— High-altitude headache is the primary symptom associated with acute mountain sickness, which may be caused by nitric oxide-mediated activation of the trigeminovascular system. Therefore, the present study examined the effects of inspiratory hypoxia on the transcerebral exchange kinetics of the vasoactive molecules, nitrite (NO2•), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP).

Methods— Ten males were examined in normoxia and after 9-hour exposure to hypoxia (12.9% O2). Global cerebral blood flow was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique with paired samples obtained from the radial artery and jugular venous bulb. Plasma CGRP and NO2• were analyzed via radioimmunoassay and ozone-based chemiluminescence. Net cerebral exchange was calculated by the Fick principle and acute mountain sickness/headache scores assessed via clinically validated questionnaires.

Results— Hypoxia increased cerebral blood flow with a corresponding increase in acute mountain sickness and headache scores (P0.05).

Conclusion— These findings argue against sustained trigeminovascular system activation as a significant event in acute mountain sickness
Iaith wreiddiolSaesneg
Tudalennau (o-i)2205 - 2208
Nifer y tudalennau3
CyfnodolynStroke
Cyfrol40
Rhif cyhoeddi6
Dynodwyr Gwrthrych Digidol (DOIs)
StatwsCyhoeddwyd - 9 Ebr 2009

Ôl bys

Gweld gwybodaeth am bynciau ymchwil 'Transcerebral Exchange Kinetics of Nitrite and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Acute Mountain Sickness Evidence Against Trigeminovascular Activation?'. Gyda’i gilydd, maen nhw’n ffurfio ôl bys unigryw.

Dyfynnu hyn