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Bird and small mammal community composition and abundance in upland open habitats and early conifer forests. / McCarthy, Alan; Caravaggi, Anthony; Fernandez-Bellon, Dario; Irwin, Sandra; Lusby, John ; O'Halloran, John .

Yn: European Journal of Wildlife Research, Cyfrol 67, Rhif 2, 26, 19.02.2021.

Allbwn ymchwil: Cyfraniad at gyfnodolynErthygl

Harvard

McCarthy, A, Caravaggi, A, Fernandez-Bellon, D, Irwin, S, Lusby, J & O'Halloran, J 2021, 'Bird and small mammal community composition and abundance in upland open habitats and early conifer forests', European Journal of Wildlife Research, cyfrol. 67, rhif 2, 26. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10344-021-01459-5

APA

McCarthy, A., Caravaggi, A., Fernandez-Bellon, D., Irwin, S., Lusby, J., & O'Halloran, J. (2021). Bird and small mammal community composition and abundance in upland open habitats and early conifer forests. European Journal of Wildlife Research, 67(2), [26]. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10344-021-01459-5

Vancouver

McCarthy A, Caravaggi A, Fernandez-Bellon D, Irwin S, Lusby J, O'Halloran J. Bird and small mammal community composition and abundance in upland open habitats and early conifer forests. European Journal of Wildlife Research. 2021 Feb 19;67(2). 26. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10344-021-01459-5

Author

McCarthy, Alan ; Caravaggi, Anthony ; Fernandez-Bellon, Dario ; Irwin, Sandra ; Lusby, John ; O'Halloran, John . / Bird and small mammal community composition and abundance in upland open habitats and early conifer forests. Yn: European Journal of Wildlife Research. 2021 ; Cyfrol 67, Rhif 2.

BibTeX

@article{18e745353cba493ca99c5a46fec4f407,
title = "Bird and small mammal community composition and abundance in upland open habitats and early conifer forests",
abstract = "Anthropogenic land-use change, such as commercial afforestation, is a significant driver of shifts in ecological communities and species abundance. In this study, the consequences of afforestation of upland habitats for two distinct animal groups, birds and small mammals, were examined by comparing open moorland, early pre-thicket conifer forests (2–4 years post-replanting) and late pre-thicket conifer forests (6–8 years post-replanting) across 24 upland study sites in Ireland. Field data were collected using bird point counts, live trapping of small mammals and detailed vegetation surveys. A total of 17 bird species and four small mammal species were detected. Both groups showed contrasting patterns of abundance between moorland and pre-thicket forests, with bird density being higher in moorland, while small mammal abundance was higher in pre-thicket forests. Bird diversity was lowest in moorland and highest in late pre-thicket forests, while small mammal diversity was highest in moorland and lowest in late pre-thicket forests. Our study shows that afforestation can alter the abundance and community composition of bird and small mammal populations and that the consequences of land-use change associated with afforestation in upland areas vary across different taxa. Our findings have important implications for forest management practices and conservation of upland habitats and species.",
keywords = "Afforestation, Biodiversity, Birds, Conifer forest, Prey, Small mammals",
author = "Alan McCarthy and Anthony Caravaggi and Dario Fernandez-Bellon and Sandra Irwin and John Lusby and John O'Halloran",
note = "Funding Information: This research would not have been possible without the outstanding assistance provided by the research assistants involved in this project, particularly Michael O{\textquoteright}Clery, Irene Sullivan, Jack Kennedy and Tony Kenneally. Sincere thanks to Caitriona Carlin, Gesche Kindermann, Colin Lawton and David Rees for providing essential field equipment. We would also like to thank the Coillte establishment foresters in our study areas, particularly Billy Horgan, Colm Lyons, Leo Byrne and Piotr Jonca. We would also like to extend our thanks to Tony Nagle, Allan Mee and David Cooke for their help and advice. We are particularly grateful to Mark Wilson, Niamh Hennessy, Pat Neville, Kevin Collins, David Tierney, Ilse Corkery, John Ballinger, Mark Ruddock, Lorcan O{\textquoteright}Toole and Ryan Wilson-Parr who contributed to the Supporting Hen Harriers in Novel Environments (SHINE) research project. Finally, we would like to thank the editor and reviewer who provided useful feedback that helped to improve this manuscript. This research was funded by the Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine and the National Parks & Wildlife Service. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH, DE part of Springer Nature. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = feb,
day = "19",
doi = "10.1007/s10344-021-01459-5",
language = "English",
volume = "67",
journal = "European Journal of Wildlife Research",
issn = "1612-4642",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bird and small mammal community composition and abundance in upland open habitats and early conifer forests

AU - McCarthy, Alan

AU - Caravaggi, Anthony

AU - Fernandez-Bellon, Dario

AU - Irwin, Sandra

AU - Lusby, John

AU - O'Halloran, John

N1 - Funding Information: This research would not have been possible without the outstanding assistance provided by the research assistants involved in this project, particularly Michael O’Clery, Irene Sullivan, Jack Kennedy and Tony Kenneally. Sincere thanks to Caitriona Carlin, Gesche Kindermann, Colin Lawton and David Rees for providing essential field equipment. We would also like to thank the Coillte establishment foresters in our study areas, particularly Billy Horgan, Colm Lyons, Leo Byrne and Piotr Jonca. We would also like to extend our thanks to Tony Nagle, Allan Mee and David Cooke for their help and advice. We are particularly grateful to Mark Wilson, Niamh Hennessy, Pat Neville, Kevin Collins, David Tierney, Ilse Corkery, John Ballinger, Mark Ruddock, Lorcan O’Toole and Ryan Wilson-Parr who contributed to the Supporting Hen Harriers in Novel Environments (SHINE) research project. Finally, we would like to thank the editor and reviewer who provided useful feedback that helped to improve this manuscript. This research was funded by the Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine and the National Parks & Wildlife Service. Publisher Copyright: © 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH, DE part of Springer Nature. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/2/19

Y1 - 2021/2/19

N2 - Anthropogenic land-use change, such as commercial afforestation, is a significant driver of shifts in ecological communities and species abundance. In this study, the consequences of afforestation of upland habitats for two distinct animal groups, birds and small mammals, were examined by comparing open moorland, early pre-thicket conifer forests (2–4 years post-replanting) and late pre-thicket conifer forests (6–8 years post-replanting) across 24 upland study sites in Ireland. Field data were collected using bird point counts, live trapping of small mammals and detailed vegetation surveys. A total of 17 bird species and four small mammal species were detected. Both groups showed contrasting patterns of abundance between moorland and pre-thicket forests, with bird density being higher in moorland, while small mammal abundance was higher in pre-thicket forests. Bird diversity was lowest in moorland and highest in late pre-thicket forests, while small mammal diversity was highest in moorland and lowest in late pre-thicket forests. Our study shows that afforestation can alter the abundance and community composition of bird and small mammal populations and that the consequences of land-use change associated with afforestation in upland areas vary across different taxa. Our findings have important implications for forest management practices and conservation of upland habitats and species.

AB - Anthropogenic land-use change, such as commercial afforestation, is a significant driver of shifts in ecological communities and species abundance. In this study, the consequences of afforestation of upland habitats for two distinct animal groups, birds and small mammals, were examined by comparing open moorland, early pre-thicket conifer forests (2–4 years post-replanting) and late pre-thicket conifer forests (6–8 years post-replanting) across 24 upland study sites in Ireland. Field data were collected using bird point counts, live trapping of small mammals and detailed vegetation surveys. A total of 17 bird species and four small mammal species were detected. Both groups showed contrasting patterns of abundance between moorland and pre-thicket forests, with bird density being higher in moorland, while small mammal abundance was higher in pre-thicket forests. Bird diversity was lowest in moorland and highest in late pre-thicket forests, while small mammal diversity was highest in moorland and lowest in late pre-thicket forests. Our study shows that afforestation can alter the abundance and community composition of bird and small mammal populations and that the consequences of land-use change associated with afforestation in upland areas vary across different taxa. Our findings have important implications for forest management practices and conservation of upland habitats and species.

KW - Afforestation

KW - Biodiversity

KW - Birds

KW - Conifer forest

KW - Prey

KW - Small mammals

U2 - 10.1007/s10344-021-01459-5

DO - 10.1007/s10344-021-01459-5

M3 - Article

VL - 67

JO - European Journal of Wildlife Research

JF - European Journal of Wildlife Research

SN - 1612-4642

IS - 2

M1 - 26

ER -

ID: 5038646